THEORY - Attacking a Business
01.07.00 Introducing interaction and isolation.

Large, well-provisioned competitors are always vulnerable to attack by smaller more agile enterprises. Market share battles can be described by the two primary maneuver forces of interaction and isolation(4). The need to increase my interaction with a customer while isolating my competition is at the heart of maneuver theory.

There are many ways one can isolate a competitor via well-timed and well-placed attacks. Generically speaking we can attack price, quality, service features and reputation. And as long as the attacks are credible I can begin isolating my competition while simultaneously increasing my interaction with the customer.

It is the interplay of interaction and isolation that allows me to shape the market to my advantage and the disadvantage of my competition. When executing a campaign we work off a campaign palette that incorporates actions designed to increase our interaction with our customers while decreasing our competitions. There are times when attacking the competition is necessary. There are other times went it is opportunistic.

(4) “Strategic Game of ? and ? (June 1987). John Boyd.

Large, well-provisioned
competitors are always vulnerable to attack
by smaller more
agile enterprises.